The Development of Windward

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Feb 102015
 

With Windward being so close to 1.0 release, I found myself looking back at the development process that got the game so far — the good, the bad and the unexpected. It was certainly an interesting project!

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Press Kit

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Feb 042015
 

With PAX East coming up in a month, I’ve had to forcefully drag myself away from development and push myself into areas I am less savvy with, such as creating a proper(ish) press kit for the media. Focusing solely on development makes it oh-so-easy to forget that the rest of the world will hardly ever be impressed by the improvements to AI or fancy procedural world generation, especially if that world’s media can’t actually find any information about the company or its projects… Thanks goes to Vlambeer for creating the presskit() tool!

Oct 112014
 

It has certainly been a while since the last post here. Looking back over the past year, I haven’t had that much time, which is understandable given the events.

At first I was with Unity Technologies, working on rebooting their UI system which was meant to be a successor for NGUI, then after I parted ways with them I was too busy with NGUI — getting it into shape, doing support, all that… And yet, somehow toward the end there I managed to return to Windward — the first game that started it all — from my venture onto the Asset Store to the development of NGUI itself.

With fresh energy driving me forward I was able to restart the project pretty much from scratch, keeping only the music and the 3D models (the latter of which I had to partially re-do, but that’s not important). Now, not even 2.5 months later Windward has been released for Steam Early Access to get the player’s feedback on the new game.

Compared to the Windward from 2012 it’s a completely different beast. Gone are the skirmish maps, replaced with large, procedurally generated worlds. Gone are the healing cannonballs and all the abilities, replaced with new mechanics and talents. The progression was changed, adding questing and trading to the mix. The game itself was redone to use TNet instead of Unity networking, which not only stabilized the multiplayer but also added the ability to save the game for free (just how TNet works!).

All in all, it has been a hectic, furious two months of development — and I enjoyed every minute of it. And now, with roughly a month to go until the full release I’m now focusing on gathering player feedback and incorporating their desired changes into the game.

Starlink

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Apr 092013
 

Starlink is a Sci-Fi real-time strategy game designed for handheld devices (ideally tablets). Play by yourself against challenging AI, cooperatively with up to 5 of your friends, or even competitively against them — whether on the same device or on multiple (over WiFi or Internet). Continue reading »

Dec 102012
 

Almost exactly a year ago I decided to make a game and wrote a UI system for it, releasing it on the Asset Store almost as an afterthought. You may know this system as NGUI — it turned out to be fairly popular. People liked its simplicity, design, and well-commented, elegant code.

Although NGUI has halted the game’s development for a short while, I did persevere, and six months ago I started working on adding multi-player functionality to that game. I tried out 3 of the top solutions, but ultimately was not happy with either. I ended up just sticking with one of them due to time constraints, but never stopped wishing that I could write my own, applying all that I’ve learned from my development of NGUI — the simplicity, power, flexibility, and well-thought out, open code.

A few weeks ago I decided to do just that and started on a new project, called Tasharen Networking Framework, or “TNet” for short. This project is now ready to be released.

Read More: http://www.tasharen.com/forum/index.php?topic=2513.0